May 17, 2022 Primary One Stop Daily Totals

One Stop – Annex at Hampstead

04/28/22 – 167                   total = 167

04/29/22 – 143                   total = 310

05/02/22 – 154                   total = 464

05/03/22 –  200                   total = 664

05/04/22 – 137                     total = 801

05/05/22 – 164                     total = 965

05/06/22 – 146                     total = 1111

05/09/22 – 159                     total = 1270

05/10/22 – 220                     total = 1490

05/11/22 – 199                      total = 1689

05/12/22 – 225                     total = 1914

05/13/22 – 319                     total = 2233

One Stop – Cooperative Extension at Burgaw

04/28/22 – 88                 total = 88

04/29/2022 – 79             total = 167

05/02/22 – 91                  total = 258

05/03/22 – 112                total = 370

05/04/22 – 93                   total = 463

05/05/22 – 87                    total = 550

05/06/22 – 80                   total = 630

05/09/22 – 91                    total = 721

05/10/22 – 101                 total = 822

05/11/22 – 108                 total = 930

05/12/22 – 118                 total = 1048

05/13/22 – 212                total = 1260

ALL ONES STOP TOTAL VOTES = 3493

 

In-person early voting starts April 28

Raleigh, N.C. — North Carolina’s 17-day, in-person early voting period begins Thursday, April 28, and ends at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 14.

The State Board of Elections offers the following 10 tips for early voters:

  1. Voters may cast a ballot at any early voting site in their county. For sites and hours in all 100 counties, use the One-Stop Early Voting Sites search tool at ncsbe.gov.
  2. Sample ballots for the primary election are available through the Voter Search tool. For more information on primary candidates for the N.C. Supreme Court and N.C. Court of Appeals, see the State Board’s Judicial Voter Guide: 2022 Primary Election. The State Board does not provide information about candidates for other contests, but some media outlets and advocacy groups do. Many candidates also have websites and social media accounts. Knowing your candidate choices in advance and being familiar with the ballot will help your voting experience go more quickly.
  3. Individuals who missed the regular voter registration deadline on April 22 may register and vote at the same time during the early voting period. Same-day registrants must attest to their eligibility and provide proof of where they live. For more information, visit Register in Person During Early Voting. This is the only option for individuals who missed the regular registration deadline to be able to register and vote in the primary.
  4. When you check in to vote at an early voting site, you may update your name or address within the same county, if necessary. You may not change your party affiliation at an early voting site during a primary election.
  5. Voters who receive an absentee ballot by mail may deliver their completed ballot to an election official at an early voting site in their county. Ballots will be kept securely and delivered to the county board of elections for processing. For more information on returning absentee-by-mail ballots, see Detailed Instructions to Vote By Mail.
  6. Voters who requested an absentee-by-mail ballot but have not yet returned it may choose instead to vote in person during the early voting period or on Election Day, May 17. Voters may discard the by-mail ballot and do not need to bring it to a voting site.
  7. Voters should keep in mind that the busiest early voting days are typically the first two and last two days – April 28–29 and May 13–14 this year.
  8. The State Board asks that all voters respect the rights of others to participate in the election. Intimidating any voter is a crime. Voters who feel harassed or intimidated should notify an election official immediately.
  9. Voters at one-stop early voting sites are entitled to the same assistance as voters at a voting place on Election Day. Curbside voting is available for eligible individuals at all early voting sites. For more information, visit Curbside Voting.
  10. North Carolina law prohibits photographing or videotaping voted ballots. Voters may use electronic devices in the voting booth to access a slate card or candidate information, provided they don’t use the devices to communicate with anyone or take photographs of their ballot.

For more information about early voting, please visit Vote Early in Person.

BUFFER ZONES

The following is a list of Pender County polling places and a description of each buffer zone concerning Election Day electioneering.  As designated by G.S. 163-166.4(a), Pender County board of elections shall, where practical, set the limit at 50 feet from the door of entrance to the voting place, measured when that door is closed, but in no event shall it set the limit at more than 50 feet or less than 25 feet. The precinct officials will mark the buffer zones at each polling place on Election Day.

 

North Burgaw:

Burgaw Middle School Gym

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

South Burgaw:

Pender County Cooperative Extension Auditorium Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Canetuck:

Canetuck Community Building

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Caswell:

Atkinson School Gym

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Columbia:

Shiloh Volunteer Fire Department

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Grady:

Moore’s Creek Missionary Baptist Church

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Upper Holly:

Maple Hill Volunteer Fire Department

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Long Creek:

Long Creek Volunteer Fire Department

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Penderlea:

Penderlea Volunteer Fire Department

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Cape Fear:

Cape Fear Elementary School

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door.

Scotts Hill:

Wesleyan Chapel Fellowship Hall

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Surf City:

Surf City Community Center Gym

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Upper Topsail:

North Topsail Elementary School

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Sloop Point:

Cape Fear Community College

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Lower Union:

Watha Town Hall/ Community Center

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Upper Union:

Union Rescue Squad Building

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Lower Topsail:

Pender County Annex Building

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Middle Topsail:

Topsail Middle School Auxiliary Gym

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

Rocky Point:

Heide Trask Auxiliary Gym

Electioneering is allowed 50 feet from front door

 

10 Things to Know as NC Primary Election Season Begins

10 Things to Know as NC Primary Election Season Begins

 

Raleigh, N.C. — This week, county boards of elections across North Carolina began sending absentee-by-mail ballots to registered voters who requested them for the May 17 primary and certain municipal elections. The following are 10 things to know as the 2022 mid-term primary election approaches.

  1. In the primary election, voters will select nominees for a political party to move on to the November 8 general election. Contests on the ballot include U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, N.C. General Assembly, state and local judges, district attorney, and county offices. In primaries, voters affiliated with a political party will be given a ballot of candidates for their party. Unaffiliated voters may choose the ballot of any party that has a primary. Libertarians do not have any primaries this year. More information: Upcoming Election. Voters in approximately 30 municipalities across the state will also go to the polls to elect mayors and city/town council members. These municipal elections occur at the same time and on the same ballot as the primary contests for the general election. To find out if your municipality is conducting an election on May 17, visit the State Board’s Local Voter Tool.
  2. For voters eligible to vote in 2022 primary and municipal elections, sample ballots are available through the State Board of Elections’ Voter Search tool. Voters also may check their registration status, Election Day polling place and additional information about their voting record using the Voter Search.
  3. Voters who have requested absentee-by-mail ballots should receive them soon. In North Carolina, any eligible voter can request, receive, and vote an absentee ballot by mail. More information: Vote By Mail.
  4. Registered voters may request a ballot online at the North Carolina Absentee Ballot Portal. Voters may also submit a ballot request by filling out the English N.C. Absentee Ballot Request Form for 2022 (PDF), the English N.C. Absentee Ballot Request Form for 2022 (non-fillable print-only PDF), or Spanish N.C. Absentee Request Form for 2022 (PDF), and returning it to their county board of elections. Voters who submit the request form, instead of using the State Board’s website, must submit the form by mail or in person. They may not submit the request form via email or fax. The absentee ballot request deadline is May 10.
  5. Overseas, military, and visually impaired voters may request, mark, and return their ballots through the State Board’s accessible portal.
  6. By-mail voters in 2022 must once again have their ballot witnessed and the return envelope signed by two individuals or a notary. For 2020 only, because of the pandemic, the witness requirement was reduced to one.
  7. By-mail voters may track their ballot using a service called BallotTrax. Sign up at BallotTrax: North Carolina. More information: Ballot Tracking Available Again for Absentee By-Mail Voters.
  8. The regular voter registration deadline for the May 17 primary election is April 22. Individuals who miss the deadline may register and vote at the same time during the in-person early voting period. More information: Registering. Registered voters may not change their party affiliation after the voter registration deadline, and they may not change their party affiliation at an early voting site.
  9. The in-person early voting period for the 2022 primary begins Thursday, April 28, and ends at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 14. Voters may cast a ballot at any early voting site in their county. Early voting sites and schedules are available at the One-Stop Early Voting Site Search. See the PDF version of all sites and schedules. More information: Vote Early in Person.
  10. Election Day is May 17. Polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. More information: Vote in Person on Election Day.

Candidate filing for 2022 elections to resume Feb. 24

Raleigh — Candidate filing for the 2022 statewide primary and rescheduled municipal elections will resume at 8 a.m. Feb. 24 and end at noon March 4.

On Dec. 8, the NC Supreme Court suspended the filing period, which had begun Dec. 6, moved the date of the statewide primary, and rescheduled municipal elections to Tuesday, May 17. The general election is on Nov. 8.

Candidates who filed before the suspension of the filing period do not need to re-file if they still wish to run for the same office. However, those candidates may withdraw their candidacy during the new filing period and instead file for any other office for which they are eligible. The deadline to withdraw is the close of business on March 1.

“Choosing to run for an elected office is a major decision,” said Karen Brinson Bell, executive director of the State Board of Elections. “We want filing to be a smooth and customer-friendly process for all candidates, and we have strived to create an efficient and safe environment for everyone.”

Depending on the office sought, candidates will file their Notices of Candidacy with either their county board of elections or the State Board of Elections.

Candidates for the following offices will file with the State Board:
• U.S. Senate
• U.S. House of Representatives
• N.C. Supreme Court Justice
• Judge of the NC Court of Appeals
• Superior Court judge
• District Court judge
• District attorney

Candidates for the following offices file with their county board of elections:
• N.C. Senate
• N.C. House of Representatives
• All county and municipal offices

Important: Candidates filing with the State Board will file at the Governor James G. Martin Building, 4381 Trinity Road, Raleigh, located on the NC State Fairgrounds. (Note: This is a change in location, as candidate filing in December was held in the Exposition Center, also on the Fairgrounds.)

Candidates, guests, and members of the media should enter the Fairgrounds through Gate 9 on Trinity Road. (See Fairgrounds map.)

Pender County provides elections brochures and videos

BURGAW – Pender County Board of Elections released eight brochures and videos to provide accurate information in the elections process. These helpful brochures cover topics such as candidate information, voter registration, a voter guide, and an elections guide.

“Using new, free animated software, we created a character named ELIN, which stands for Election Information,” Susan Williams, Pender County Board of Elections director. “ELIN covers election law and provides information on various voting methods.”

Two of the eight videos are now available on the county website, www.pendercountync.gov, at https://www.pendercountync.gov/boe/documents-base/introduction-to-elin-video/ and https://www.pendercountync.gov/boe/did-you-know.

The eight brochures are titled: Welcome ELIN Guide, Candidate Guide, MAT Teams Guide (Multi-partisan Assistance Team), Precinct Official Guide, Elections Guide, Voter Guide, and Registration Drive Guide. The Pender County Board of Elections staff created a guide for children that is filled with fun facts about voting and crossword puzzles.

Williams said the easy-to-follow brochures and the ELIN videos were created to make election law easy to understand and to encourage more people to get involved through MATs Teams, work at a polling booth, how to become a precinct official, or how to become a candidate.

“The Board of Elections has the legal and moral responsibility for protecting the will of the people and our democracy as a concept and form of government,” said Williams. “Pender County Board of Elections is the first step in democracy by providing efficient, fair, and open elections. That is our goal in creating these easy-to-follow brochures.”

The brochures can be found at the Board of Elections, 807 S. Walker St., as well as the Central Administration building’s front entrance, the Burgaw and Hampstead branch libraries, the Hampstead Annex, the county’s social services, health department, and at the tourism office in Burgaw.

For more information call the Board of Elections at 910-259-1220.

BOARD MEETINGS

The Pender County Board of Elections will meet at 6pm for the monthly meeting on the second Tuesday of every month unless otherwise posted.

All Attendees should enter through FRONT door. For security reasons the back door is for staff only.

This meeting will be held in the Board room at the Elections office located at 807 S. Walker Street Burgaw NC, 28425 _______________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Board Of Elections Annex Hours

The Board of Elections will be available at the Hampstead Annex every Tuesday and Thursday starting December 7, 2021.

Our Hours will be from 9 AM – 3 PM

We will offer voter registration forms, Candidate filing, Campaign Finance assistance, Absentee requests and Information requests.

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