Substantial rainfall floods local roads, caution urged

PENDER COUNTY – Pender County Emergency Management urges motorists to stay alert to flooded roadways.
“Due to the substantial rainfall we are experiencing in Pender County, our roads will be impacted,” Carson Smith, Interim Emergency Manager, said. “Pender County is currently under a Flash Flood Watch. We urge motorists to turn around, don’t drown. This is more than just a cliché. Flash floods are the number one weather-related killer in the United States.”
Smith said currently the following roads are affected by flooding as of 3 p.m., Feb. 18.
  • Willard Railroad Street at the Bridge of the Pender/Duplin County line
  • NC Hwy 50 at the curve just before the Pender/Duplin County line
  • 2356-3276 block of the Old Maple Hill Rd
  • 2593-3573 block Croomsbridge Rd
  • 0-735 River Bend Drive
  • All of River Birch Rd
  • All of Bear Run Rd
  • 485-510 block River Trail
  • 0-245 block Rebecca Kennedy Rd
  • 500-5100 block Heading Bluff Road
  • 4000 block of Herrings Chapel Rd
  • Malpass Corner Road and Herrings Chapel Road
  • 2460-2345 block NC Hwy 53 West
  • 2500 block of Shiloh Rd
  • Patriots Hall Drive past the Ranger Station
  • All of Caldonia Creek Rd
  • All of Northeast Drive
  • 100-849 block Old Blake House Road
  • 1500 block of S. Shore Drive
  • 1600 block of S. Shore Drive
  • 1900 block of S. Shore Drive
  • 2400 block of S. Shore Drive
  • 2800 block of S. Shore Drive
  • NC Hwy 133 at Cedar Farms Lane
  • 44 Saddle Ridge Rd
“Please don’t drive through swift-moving water on the roadways,” said Smith. “Only a few inches of swift-moving water can lift an automobile from the roadway. Flooded roadways can make a road surface unstable and drivers may not be aware of dangers beneath the water. It’s safer to find an alternative route.”
Motorists can find travel alerts and road closures on the North Carolina Department of Transportation’s site, www.DriveNC.gov.
Smith said, based upon the weather forecast, some areas in Pender County will experience river flooding through next weekend.
Pender County Emergency Management will update any changes in road conditions.
Visit www.FIMAN.nc.gov for the latest flood information from the state’s network of more than 500 river, stream, and coastal gauges.
For more information, watch our Pender County Emergency Management website or Facebook. If you have not signed up for the CodeRed alert system, register for free at https://www.pendercountync.gov/em/notices-base/ or call 910-259-1210 for details.

Due to inclement weather nationwide, vaccine shipments have been delayed.  We are unable to schedule vaccination appointments at this time.

Please continue to monitor our website, pendercountync.gov, Facebook and news outlets for updates.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments available online or by phone for Thursday, Feb. 18 in Hampstead

PENDER COUNTY – COVID-19 Vaccination appointments are now being accepted for Thursday, Feb. 18, at the Pender County Hampstead Annex, 15060 US Hwy. 17.

Citizens ages 65 and older and health care workers may schedule an appointment online on the county’s website, pendercountync.gov, and click on the red banner across the screen.

Citizens without the ability to make an appointment online can call 910-663-4200 for assistance.

There is limited vaccine available.

If citizens miss this opportunity to be vaccinated, continue to monitor the county’s website, Pender County’s Facebook page, and the local news for future vaccine appointments.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments available online or by phone for Tuesday, Feb. 16, in Burgaw

PENDER COUNTY – COVID-19 Vaccination appointments are NOW being accepted for Tuesday, Feb. 16, at the Pender County Health Department, 803 S. Walker St. in Burgaw.

Citizens may schedule an appointment online on the county’s website, pendercountync.gov, and click on the red banner across the screen.

Citizens without the ability to make an appointment online can call 910-663-4200 for assistance.

There is limited vaccine available.

If citizens miss this opportunity to be vaccinated, continue to monitor the county’s website, Pender County’s Facebook page, and the local news for future vaccine appointments.

COVID-19 vaccination appointments available TODAY online or by phone

PENDER COUNTY – COVID-19 Vaccination appointments are now available for TODAY, Wednesday, Feb. 10, at the Pender County Health Department, 803 S. Walker St. in Burgaw.

Citizens may schedule an appointment online on the county’s website, pendercountync.gov, and click on the red banner across the screen.

Citizens without the ability to make an appointment online can call 910-663-4200 for assistance.

There is limited vaccine available.

If citizens miss this opportunity to be vaccinated, continue to monitor the county’s website, Pender County’s Facebook page, and the local news for future vaccine appointments.

 

COVID-19 vaccination appointments available online or by phone

PENDER COUNTY – COVID-19 Vaccination appointments are now available for Thursday, Feb. 11, at the Pender County Government Annex in Hampstead.
 
Citizens may schedule an appointment online on the county’s website, pendercountync.gov, and click on the red banner across the screen.
 
Citizens also have the option of scheduling an appointment by calling 910-663-4200.
 
There is a limited vaccine available.
 
If citizens miss this opportunity to be vaccinated, continue to monitor the county’s website, Pender County’s Facebook page, and the local news for future vaccine appointments.

Pender County COVID Vaccine Information Center opens telephone line for questions

BURGAW – Today Pender County Health and Human Services opened a new phone line dedicated to taking calls exclusive to COVID-19 vaccination information. The phone number is 910-663-4200.

Personnel is standing by 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday to answer calls regarding the pandemic.

“The Pender County Health Department has taken thousands of calls,” said Carolyn Moser, Pender County Health and Human Services Director. “This new telephone number will help us to better serve our residents.”

 

North Carolina to begin modified stay at home order to slow COVID-19 spread

Order will require people to stay at home from 10 pm to 5 am with certain businesses required to be closed during those hours

More than 80 percent of NC counties now in the red or orange categories

RALEIGH: Governor Roy Cooper and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mandy Cohen today announced that North Carolina will begin a Modified Stay at Home Order after a rapid increase in North Carolina’s key COVID-19 trends. The Order requires people to stay at home between 10 pm and 5 am and takes effect Friday, December 11 and will be in place until at least January 8, 2021.

“We already have strong safety protocols and capacity limitations in place – including a statewide mask requirement. With this additional action beginning Friday, we hope to get these numbers down,” Governor Cooper said. “Our new modified Stay At Home order aims to limit gatherings and get people home where they are safer, especially during the holidays. It’s also a reminder that we must be vigilant the rest of the day – wearing a face mask when we are with people we don’t live with, keeping a safe distance from others and washing our hands a lot.”

The Order requires restaurants, bars, entertainment venues, personal care businesses and more to close at 10 pm. Travel to and from work; to obtain food, medical care, fuel or social services; or to take care of a family member is exempted. Read more in the Frequently Asked Questions document.

In the past week, North Carolina’s case count has broken single-day records on three separate days, including crossing more than 6,000 cases per day on two of those days. Just a month ago, cases were under 3,000 per day. In recent days, the percent of tests returning positive has increased to more than 10%.

Governor Cooper was clear that further action would be taken to slow the spread of the virus if trends do not improve. This could require further limiting of restaurant dining, indoor entertainment or shopping and retail capacity restrictions, among other safety protocols.

Dr. Cohen also provided an update on North Carolina’s COVID-19 County Alert System map. The number of red counties (critical community spread) has more than doubled since November 23, up to 48 red counties from 20 red counties. There are now 34 orange counties (substantial community spread), as compared to 42 orange counties from the previous report. With today’s report, more than 80% of the state’s counties fall into the red or orange tier. Read the update to see where each county stands and how the system was designed.

“Your actions can keep people from getting sick, save lives, and make sure our hospitals can care for people whether it’s for a heart attack or a car accident or COVID-19. Protect yourself, your loved ones, and your community now,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen, M.D.

Dr. Cohen also provided an update on North Carolina’s data and trends.

Trajectory in COVID-Like Illness (CLI) Surveillance Over 14 Days
• North Carolina’s syndromic surveillance trend for COVID-like illness is increasing.

Trajectory of Confirmed Cases Over 14 Days
• North Carolina’s trajectory of cases is increasing.

Trajectory in Percent of Tests Returning Positive Over 14 Days
• North Carolina’s trajectory in percent of tests returning positive is increasing.

Trajectory in Hospitalizations Over 14 Days
• North Carolina’s trajectory of hospitalizations is increasing.

In addition to these metrics, the state continues building capacity to adequately respond to an increase in virus spread in testing, tracing and prevention.

Testing
• Testing capacity is high, surpassing 50,000 tests per day for much of the past week.

Tracing Capability
• The state is continuing to hire contact tracers to bolster the efforts of local health departments.
• There have been more than 500,000 downloads of the exposure notification app, SlowCOVIDNC.

Personal Protective Equipment
• North Carolina’s personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies are stable.

Read Executive Order 181.

Read a Frequently Asked Questions document about the Order.

Read the slides from today’s briefing.

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