Governor Cooper Urges Caution as North Carolina begins to feel Ian’s effects

Storm track has moved east with higher rain totals now expected in central North Carolina

Hurricane Ian made landfall in South Carolina at 2:05 PM

RALEIGH: Governor Cooper is urging North Carolinians to be safe and cautious during heavy rainfall, possible flooding and power outages as Hurricane Ian bears down on the state.

“Our message today is simple. Be smart and be safe. We’ve faced storms like this before and we know what to do,” Governor Cooper said. “Especially this weekend, I appreciate the efforts of emergency management officials, our national guard, state highway patrol, and other first responders to keep people safe.”

Widespread rainfall amounts of two to six inches are expected across the state going into early Saturday with locally higher totals up to eight inches. This rainfall could lead to flash flooding, coastal storm surge, landslides in the mountains, and rising rivers. A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for all of North Carolina except southwestern portions of the state.

Gusty winds will continue on Friday, peaking in the afternoon and into the overnight hours going into Saturday. Western North Carolina could see gusts of up to 35-55 miles per hour. Most North Carolina counties are under a Wind Advisory into Saturday.

The State Emergency Response Team activated Thursday at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh and moved to 24-hour operations on Friday morning and will continue through the weekend.

The NCDOT has reported ferry routes are shut down. For the latest information on road closures, visit drivenc.gov. More than 10,000 utility workers in the Carolinas are poised to respond to power outages when it’s safe to do so. More than 2,200 NCDOT officials prepared equipment and are on standby waiting to respond around-the-clock later today and into this weekend. Crews fueled up and prepared more than 221 motor graders, 376 backhoes and loaders, 1,440 chainsaws, and 1,368 trucks to cut and shove downed trees and debris from roads.

More than 29,000 homes and businesses were without power as of 1:30 pm.

Residents are advised to stay aware and keep a watch on the forecast for Friday and over the weekend. State officials advise these tips to make sure your family is personally prepared:

• Have multiple ways to receive emergency info, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on your cell phone and download a weather app.
• Have an emergency plan. Know where you would go if you need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.
• Gather some emergency supplies or refresh your emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.
• If you live at the coast, you should know if you live in a coastal evacuation zone. Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are in a pre-determined evacuation zone. Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.
• Check to see if your community offers emergency alert services for its residents.
• Avoid unnecessary travel.

Links:

https://drivenc.gov/

Pender County Government Offices Closed Sept. 30

BURGAW- Due to Hurricane Ian’s approach, Pender County government offices will be closed Friday, Sept. 30.

Any inspections scheduled by the planning department for Friday will be performed on Monday, pending the extent of the storm.

Pender County Emergency Management has activated the Emergency Operations Center and staff is monitoring the storm.

Pender County officials urge all residents to stay off the roads, secure property and stay alert to all warnings and weather reports.

 

Pender County Declares State of Emergency, effective Sept. 30, 8 a.m.

PENDER COUNTY – With Hurricane Ian approaching the East Coast, Pender County authorities declared a state of emergency effective Friday, Sept. 30, at 8 a.m.

“As of Thursday afternoon, Hurricane Ian was downgraded to a tropical storm. However, it’s possible this storm could strengthen over the Atlantic Ocean and once again become a Category 1 hurricane,” said Tommy Batson, Pender County Emergency Director. “The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will activate tomorrow morning, and we will continue to monitor this storm.”

Pender County Emergency Management urges all residents to prepare now for possible high winds, possible tornadoes, loss of electricity, and flash flooding.

Remember to secure all pets and have enough food and water for seven days.

Pender County Emergency Management will post updates on the Facebook page at facebook.com/penderem and on the website http://www.penderem.com. If you need assistance call the EM office at 910- 259-1210.

 

Governor Urges Weather Awareness, Preparation Ahead of Ian

Ian expected to strengthen into Category 1 Hurricane before making landfall in South Carolina

 

RALEIGH: Governor Cooper is encouraging North Carolinians to pay close attention to the weather and take necessary precautions as the remnants of Hurricane Ian approach the state.

“Hurricane Ian reminds us how unpredictable these storms can be and North Carolinians should be prepared when it reaches our state,” Governor Cooper said Thursday. “Heavy rains, up to seven inches in some areas, are likely to bring some flooding. Landslides are a threat in our mountains and there’s a chance of tornadoes statewide. Coastal flooding and gusty winds are likely as the storm passes through. This storm is still dangerous.”

Effects from Ian will arrive as soon as Thursday evening, with potential impacts including significant rainfall statewide, gusty winds, flash flooding and storm surge in coastal counties. Heavy rain will arrive along the NC coast tonight, spreading westward during the day Friday.

As of 11 a.m. Thursday, the National Weather Service issued a tropical storm warning and storm surge watch for large portions of eastern North Carolina, from Dare County to the South Carolina border. The area under the greatest threat of flash flooding is along the NC/SC border and in portions of the southern mountains. In addition to flash flooding, heavy rain could create the potential for landslides and river flooding in Western North Carolina.

On Wednesday, Governor Cooper declared a State of Emergency, activating the state’s emergency operations plan, waiving transportation rules governing fuel and critical supplies and protecting consumers from price gouging. On Thursday morning, the State Emergency Response Team activated at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh, with plans to begin 24-hour operations Friday morning.

As Ian approaches, state officials advise these tips to make sure your family is personally prepared:

  • Have multiple ways to receive emergency info, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on your cell phone and download a weather app.
  • Have an emergency plan. Know where you would go if you need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.
  • Gather some emergency supplies or refresh your emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.
  • If you live at the coast, you should know if you live in a coastal evacuation zone. Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are in a pre-determined evacuation zone. Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.
  • Check to see if your community offers emergency alert services for its residents.
  • Avoid unnecessary travel.

The latest NC Emergency Management forecast can be found at https://www.readync.gov/weather. Follow @NCEmergency on Twitter and Facebook for the latest information on Hurricane Ian and how you can prepare. Today’s press conference can be viewed here.

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People Urged to Avoid Unnecessary Travel When Tropical System Ian Hits N.C.

RALEIGH – State transportation officials are prepared for Ian and are urging people to avoid any unnecessary travel starting Friday into the weekend.

“This storm could make travel treacherous in North Carolina,” said J. Eric Boyette, North Carolina’s Transportation Secretary. “Please monitor your local weather and if you don’t need to be on the roads, stay home.”

Highways

More than 2,200 N.C. Department of Transportation employees in all 100 counties have prepared equipment for possible clearing efforts, repairs and pipe replacements after the storm passes.

NCDOT has readied 374 backhoes and loaders, 223 motor graders, 1,436 chainsaws and 1,371 trucks so they can clear downed trees and other debris from roads as soon as possible. Transportation crews have also ensured dozens of portable generators are ready, and that traffic services offices are staging message boards. Also, crews have loaded emergency trailers with 4,623 barricades, 3,698 high water signs and 2,749 road closure signs so they can be deployed as needed.

Staff have also examined flood-prone areas to ensure grates, storm drains and culverts are clear. Crews in some flood-prone areas have been staging equipment to expedite the state’s response. NCDOT staff have also instructed contractors on active construction projects to secure cones and message boards due to possible high winds. Road construction statewide will be paused due to severe weather impacts.

NCDOT divisions have arranged to have staff on-call to respond around-the-clock throughout the weekend and have placed contractors on standby.

Once NCDOT crews can assess the damage, the agency will work to get roads open as quickly as possible and will use emergency contracts if needed.

 

“Until it is safe, people should stay off the roads in storm-affected areas,” said Joey Hopkins, NCDOT’s chief operating officer. “Don’t drive through roads with standing water, and never drive around barricades. They are there to protect you.”

 

Safe driving tips can be found at ncdot.gov.

 

New advance flood-warning system

This storm will mark the first time North Carolina officials will use the state’s new advanced flood-warning system during a major weather event. The system relies on data from a network of 400 river and stream gauges so NCDOT and State Emergency Management officials can analyze, map and communicate in real-time any flood risks to roads, bridges and culverts. The system will enable NCDOT to know more quickly where and when to close roads and alert first responders and the public. Real-time travel updates can be found at DriveNC.Gov.

Aviation

In recent weeks, NCDOT staff flew a drone mission from Ocracoke to Kitty Hawk to obtain overhead video of dune conditions. These will be used to conduct any post-damage assessments. The Division of Aviation is also monitoring the status of North Carolina’s public airports so state and federal officials will know which airports can be accessed for relief efforts.

 

Ferries

State Ferry Division officials ended the Ocracoke Express’ 2022 seasonal passenger ferry service after the 7:30 p.m. departure Wednesday, two days earlier than originally planned. Officials also suspended service on the Cedar Island-Ocracoke, Swan Quarter-Ocracoke and the Southport-Fort Fisher routes Thursday due to weather conditions. The Hatteras-Ocracoke vehicle ferry is now on a limited schedule due to high wind conditions. Other North Carolina ferry routes will likely be impacted as the weather deteriorates. Travelers are urged to check on their route’s status via the Twitter feeds found ncferry.org under the heading “Current Conditions” or call their route’s terminal office before arriving. Staff at all seven ferry terminals are checking fuel supplies, generators and testing radios. Ferries not in service have been secured.

 

Rail

Amtrak has suspended some services that operate through North Carolina serving southern Georgia and Florida. Please visit Amtrak.com for updates. NCDOT Rail and Amtrak officials will continue to monitor weather conditions to determine whether to make any schedule changes. For the latest updates on NC By Train passenger train schedules, call 1-800-BY-TRAIN or check NCByTrain.org.

 

Ports

Due to anticipated high winds, the North Carolina Ports Authority will pause vessel operations Friday in Wilmington and Morehead City.

 

Division of Motor Vehicles

The Division of Motor Vehicles is monitoring conditions and could close some offices Friday afternoon in impacted areas. Closures and changes to office hours can be found on the NCDMV office locations page. Many driver and vehicle services are available online at the official NCDMV website, MyNCDMV.gov.

 

For real-time travel information, visit DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on social media.

RE-BID: Emergency Watershed Protection-Sediment Removal/Dredging Project-Northeast Cape Fear River RFP # 5038-Round 2 DSR/494/Site 1-Northeast Cape Fear River

This is a re-bid.  The Pender County Planning & Community Development Department (Pender County) seeks to establish a contract with an experienced contractor, or contractors, to provide Channel Dredging & Sediment Removal Services in the Northeast Cape Fear River adjacent to Ruddy Duck Lane, Turtle Hill Trail, and Mallard Roost Drive near Burgaw, NC. The primary responsibility of the Contractor will be to remove an identified accumulation of sediment from the bottom of the Northeast Cape Fear River in a section of river channel approximately 1500 linear feet (LF) long. The estimated volume of dredge spoil material to be removed from the river channel is approximately 9,000 to 10,000 cubic yards (CYS). The Contractor will be responsible for excavating/removing, transporting, off-loading, and delivery of dredge spoils to their final deposition. Nearby upland disposal/containment areas have been identified by the County and are undergoing permit review by the NC Division of Coastal Management and the US Army Corps of Engineers. These tentative disposal areas are available to the Contractor for use at their discretion, or the Contractor has the option to locate their own upland disposal area, assuming the location is suitable, and meets all regulatory permitting requirements. The Contractor shall dewater the dredge spoil material prior to transporting over State or Federal highways to any approved and permitted upland Disposal Area. Dredge material or waters incorporated in the dredge material matrix must be contained at all times and not allowed to re-enter the Northeast Cape Fear River unless the material is sufficiently filtered and all silt/clay size particulate matter is removed. Disposal areas used for final disposition of the dredge spoils must also be contained temporarily with adequate sedimentation and erosion control measures (silt fencing, berms, etc.), and filtering systems to manage dredge waters until the dredge material dries and solidifies in the dike system. This requirement for dredge water management will be in effect and shall be maintained until such time a permanent groundcover is established on the outside side slopes of the earthen-diked disposal area and across the full crest of the dredge pile. An optional pre-proposal conference is planned for this RFP to be held on October 11, 2022 for a site walk and a briefing.  Contractors are advised to meet in the parking lot at 805 S. Walker Street, Burgaw, NC 28425 by 9:00am. County staff will lead a caravan to each site. Questions are due by October 12, 2022 at 8am.  The deadline to submit a proposal is October 14, 2022 at 2pm. Proposals must be submitted via FedEx, UPS, or hand delivered to 805 S. Walker Street, Burgaw, NC 28425. If you have questions please contact Daniel Adams at 910.259.0231.  Click here to view the full RFP # 5038-Round 2 DSR/494/Site 1-Northeast Cape Fear River and click here to view the associated plans/documents.

Pender County reserves the right to reject any/all proposals.

NC Gov. Cooper issues a State of Emergency

Governor Cooper Issues State of Emergency in Advance of Severe Weather

View the State of Emergency Order

RALEIGH: In advance of Hurricane Ian’s remnants moving through the state, Governor Roy Cooper declared a State of Emergency today to activate the state’s emergency operations plan, waive transportation rules to help the transport of fuel and critical supplies, help first responders and the agriculture industry and protect consumers from price gouging.

“A State of Emergency is needed now so that farmers and those preparing for the storm can more quickly get ready for the heavy rain that is likely to fall in much of our state,” said Governor Cooper. “North Carolinians should stay aware, keep a close eye on the forecast and prepare their emergency supplies.”

North Carolinians can expect heavy rainfall and possible flooding and tornadoes on Friday and Saturday from the remnants of Hurricane Ian. The State Emergency Response Team will activate on Thursday at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh and plans to move to 24-hour operations on Friday morning.

Executive Order 270 waives the size and weight requirements for vehicles engaged in relief efforts before, during and after the severe weather, including power restoration and debris removal, as well as the transportation of goods like food, fuel, and medical supplies. The order also helps North Carolina’s agricultural sector by temporarily suspending the weighing of vehicles used to transport livestock, poultry or crops ready to be harvested. The Council of State concurred with the waiver of transportation regulations in the order today.

In addition, North Carolina’s price gouging law against overcharging in a state of emergency is now in effect statewide.

Governor Cooper also authorized the activation of about 80 members of the North Carolina National Guard to assist as needed.

North Carolinians are advised to stay aware and keep a close eye on the forecast for the next several days. Much of North Carolina is forecast to see 2-5 inches late this week and weekend, but 5-7 inches or more will be possible near the coast and along the Blue Ridge Escarpment. These rainfall totals could lead to localized flash flooding, landslides in the mountains, and rises on main-stem rivers. Rainfall totals and the timing of the heaviest rain could be adjusted based on the eventual track of Ian.

Gusty winds, isolated tornadoes, minor coastal flooding and hazardous marine conditions will also be possible late this week and weekend as Ian moves through the region. Isolated downed trees and power outages will be possible due to gusty winds and saturated soils.

The Governor and state officials advise these tips to make sure people are personally prepared:
• Have multiple ways to receive emergency information, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on a cell phone and download a weather app.
• Have an emergency plan. Know where to go if there’s a need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.
• Gather some emergency supplies or refresh an emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.
• If people live at the coast, be aware if you live in a coastal evacuation zone. Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are located in a pre-determined evacuation zone. Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.

Visit ReadyNC.gov for additional information on weather preparation, as well as information on power outages. Visit DriveNC.gov for current travel conditions from NCDOT.

EO270 - SOE Hurricane Ian

North Carolina Prepares for Remnants of Hurricane Ian

RALEIGH – North Carolina is preparing for heavy rainfall and possible flooding on Friday and Saturday from the remnants of Hurricane Ian. Governor Cooper reminds residents that now is the time to complete their personal preparations.

“While we don’t yet know exactly how this storm will impact our state, it’s clear that this will be a significant rain event for much of North Carolina and now is the time for people to get prepared,” said Governor Cooper. “We are tracking the storm closely and strongly encourage everyone across the state to have an emergency kit and emergency plan in place.”

The State Emergency Response Team will activate Thursday at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh and plans to move to 24-hour operations on Friday morning.

“We are coordinating with our partners in government and the non-profit and private sectors to make sure we are ready to support local communities through whatever Ian brings,” said State Emergency Management Director Will Ray.

Residents are advised to stay aware and keep a close eye on the forecast for the next several days. With each passing day, Ian’s expected impacts to North Carolina become clearer.

Rain chances will increase across southeastern North Carolina Thursday night, with the most widespread rainfall expected on Friday and Saturday.  Much of North Carolina is forecast to see 2-5 inches late this week and weekend, but 5-7 inches or more will be possible near the coast and along the Blue Ridge Escarpment.

These rainfall totals could lead to localized flash flooding, landslides in the mountains, and rises on main-stem rivers. Rainfall totals and the timing of the heaviest rain could be adjusted based on the eventual track of Ian.

Gusty winds, isolated tornadoes, minor coastal flooding, and hazardous marine conditions will also be possible late this week and weekend as Ian moves through the region. Isolated downed trees and power outages will be possible due to gusty winds and saturated soils.

State officials advise these tips to make sure your family is personally prepared:

·         Have multiple ways to receive emergency info, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on your cell phone and download a weather app.

·         Have an emergency plan. Know where you would go if you need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.

·         Gather some emergency supplies or refresh your emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.

·         If you live at the coast, you should know if you live in a coastal evacuation zone.  Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are in a pre-determined evacuation zone.   Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.

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