RE-BID: Emergency Watershed Protection-Sediment Removal/Dredging Project-Northeast Cape Fear River RFP # 5038-Round 2 DSR/494/Site 1-Northeast Cape Fear River

This is a re-bid.  The Pender County Planning & Community Development Department (Pender County) seeks to establish a contract with an experienced contractor, or contractors, to provide Channel Dredging & Sediment Removal Services in the Northeast Cape Fear River adjacent to Ruddy Duck Lane, Turtle Hill Trail, and Mallard Roost Drive near Burgaw, NC. The primary responsibility of the Contractor will be to remove an identified accumulation of sediment from the bottom of the Northeast Cape Fear River in a section of river channel approximately 1500 linear feet (LF) long. The estimated volume of dredge spoil material to be removed from the river channel is approximately 9,000 to 10,000 cubic yards (CYS). The Contractor will be responsible for excavating/removing, transporting, off-loading, and delivery of dredge spoils to their final deposition. Nearby upland disposal/containment areas have been identified by the County and are undergoing permit review by the NC Division of Coastal Management and the US Army Corps of Engineers. These tentative disposal areas are available to the Contractor for use at their discretion, or the Contractor has the option to locate their own upland disposal area, assuming the location is suitable, and meets all regulatory permitting requirements. The Contractor shall dewater the dredge spoil material prior to transporting over State or Federal highways to any approved and permitted upland Disposal Area. Dredge material or waters incorporated in the dredge material matrix must be contained at all times and not allowed to re-enter the Northeast Cape Fear River unless the material is sufficiently filtered and all silt/clay size particulate matter is removed. Disposal areas used for final disposition of the dredge spoils must also be contained temporarily with adequate sedimentation and erosion control measures (silt fencing, berms, etc.), and filtering systems to manage dredge waters until the dredge material dries and solidifies in the dike system. This requirement for dredge water management will be in effect and shall be maintained until such time a permanent groundcover is established on the outside side slopes of the earthen-diked disposal area and across the full crest of the dredge pile. An optional pre-proposal conference is planned for this RFP to be held on October 11, 2022 for a site walk and a briefing.  Contractors are advised to meet in the parking lot at 805 S. Walker Street, Burgaw, NC 28425 by 9:00am. County staff will lead a caravan to each site. Questions are due by October 12, 2022 at 8am.  The deadline to submit a proposal is October 14, 2022 at 2pm. Proposals must be submitted via FedEx, UPS, or hand delivered to 805 S. Walker Street, Burgaw, NC 28425. If you have questions please contact Daniel Adams at 910.259.0231.  Click here to view the full RFP # 5038-Round 2 DSR/494/Site 1-Northeast Cape Fear River and click here to view the associated plans/documents.

Pender County reserves the right to reject any/all proposals.

NC Gov. Cooper issues a State of Emergency

Governor Cooper Issues State of Emergency in Advance of Severe Weather

View the State of Emergency Order

RALEIGH: In advance of Hurricane Ian’s remnants moving through the state, Governor Roy Cooper declared a State of Emergency today to activate the state’s emergency operations plan, waive transportation rules to help the transport of fuel and critical supplies, help first responders and the agriculture industry and protect consumers from price gouging.

“A State of Emergency is needed now so that farmers and those preparing for the storm can more quickly get ready for the heavy rain that is likely to fall in much of our state,” said Governor Cooper. “North Carolinians should stay aware, keep a close eye on the forecast and prepare their emergency supplies.”

North Carolinians can expect heavy rainfall and possible flooding and tornadoes on Friday and Saturday from the remnants of Hurricane Ian. The State Emergency Response Team will activate on Thursday at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh and plans to move to 24-hour operations on Friday morning.

Executive Order 270 waives the size and weight requirements for vehicles engaged in relief efforts before, during and after the severe weather, including power restoration and debris removal, as well as the transportation of goods like food, fuel, and medical supplies. The order also helps North Carolina’s agricultural sector by temporarily suspending the weighing of vehicles used to transport livestock, poultry or crops ready to be harvested. The Council of State concurred with the waiver of transportation regulations in the order today.

In addition, North Carolina’s price gouging law against overcharging in a state of emergency is now in effect statewide.

Governor Cooper also authorized the activation of about 80 members of the North Carolina National Guard to assist as needed.

North Carolinians are advised to stay aware and keep a close eye on the forecast for the next several days. Much of North Carolina is forecast to see 2-5 inches late this week and weekend, but 5-7 inches or more will be possible near the coast and along the Blue Ridge Escarpment. These rainfall totals could lead to localized flash flooding, landslides in the mountains, and rises on main-stem rivers. Rainfall totals and the timing of the heaviest rain could be adjusted based on the eventual track of Ian.

Gusty winds, isolated tornadoes, minor coastal flooding and hazardous marine conditions will also be possible late this week and weekend as Ian moves through the region. Isolated downed trees and power outages will be possible due to gusty winds and saturated soils.

The Governor and state officials advise these tips to make sure people are personally prepared:
• Have multiple ways to receive emergency information, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on a cell phone and download a weather app.
• Have an emergency plan. Know where to go if there’s a need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.
• Gather some emergency supplies or refresh an emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.
• If people live at the coast, be aware if you live in a coastal evacuation zone. Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are located in a pre-determined evacuation zone. Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.

Visit ReadyNC.gov for additional information on weather preparation, as well as information on power outages. Visit DriveNC.gov for current travel conditions from NCDOT.

EO270 - SOE Hurricane Ian

North Carolina Prepares for Remnants of Hurricane Ian

RALEIGH – North Carolina is preparing for heavy rainfall and possible flooding on Friday and Saturday from the remnants of Hurricane Ian. Governor Cooper reminds residents that now is the time to complete their personal preparations.

“While we don’t yet know exactly how this storm will impact our state, it’s clear that this will be a significant rain event for much of North Carolina and now is the time for people to get prepared,” said Governor Cooper. “We are tracking the storm closely and strongly encourage everyone across the state to have an emergency kit and emergency plan in place.”

The State Emergency Response Team will activate Thursday at the State Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh and plans to move to 24-hour operations on Friday morning.

“We are coordinating with our partners in government and the non-profit and private sectors to make sure we are ready to support local communities through whatever Ian brings,” said State Emergency Management Director Will Ray.

Residents are advised to stay aware and keep a close eye on the forecast for the next several days. With each passing day, Ian’s expected impacts to North Carolina become clearer.

Rain chances will increase across southeastern North Carolina Thursday night, with the most widespread rainfall expected on Friday and Saturday.  Much of North Carolina is forecast to see 2-5 inches late this week and weekend, but 5-7 inches or more will be possible near the coast and along the Blue Ridge Escarpment.

These rainfall totals could lead to localized flash flooding, landslides in the mountains, and rises on main-stem rivers. Rainfall totals and the timing of the heaviest rain could be adjusted based on the eventual track of Ian.

Gusty winds, isolated tornadoes, minor coastal flooding, and hazardous marine conditions will also be possible late this week and weekend as Ian moves through the region. Isolated downed trees and power outages will be possible due to gusty winds and saturated soils.

State officials advise these tips to make sure your family is personally prepared:

·         Have multiple ways to receive emergency info, including watches and warnings. Make sure emergency alerts are enabled on your cell phone and download a weather app.

·         Have an emergency plan. Know where you would go if you need to evacuate. Make a plan to stay with family, friends or at a hotel. Public shelters should be a last resort.

·         Gather some emergency supplies or refresh your emergency kit. Visit ReadyNC.gov for info on how to build an emergency kit.

·         If you live at the coast, you should know if you live in a coastal evacuation zone.  Visit KnowYourZone.nc.gov to see if you are in a pre-determined evacuation zone.   Learn your zone and listen for it if evacuations are ordered by local governments.

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Healthy Pender Survey 2022

Pender County Health Department and partner organizations are conducting a survey to learn more about the health and topics of concern among the residents living in Pender County. We will use the results of this survey to help address major community health issues in our county.
This survey is completely voluntary and should take about 10-15 minutes to complete. Your answers will be completely confidential and the information you give us will not be linked to you in any way.

https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8oGDg4dXu6dT6MC?Source=email

Upset Bid Opportunity for 2.49 acres near Red Tip Lane, parcel # 2393-48-3645-0000

For your consideration is an upset bid process for parcel number 2393-48-3645-0000 located near Red Tip Lane that was acquired on 8/20/2018 thru tax foreclosure proceedings.  The parcel consists of a wooded lot on 2.49 acres.  The estimated tax value of the parcel is $19,460.00 in GIS.  Mr. Matthew Walker has placed a bid offer of $12,000.00.

Published notice of the summary of this resolution will be by electronic advertisement on the County’s website located under Bid & RFP’s and through the local paper. The electronic published notice and local paper is pursuant to G.S. Chapter 160A-269. Upset Bids will be only be accepted through September 22, 2022 at 5:00pm.

Per NC General Statutes § 160A-269, the new bid must be the greater of either a $750.00 increase or 5% more than the outstanding bid.  For example if the 5% is equal to $1,000.00 then you would have to bid the $1,000.00 – not just the $750.00.  This bidding process could potentially go on for multiple cycles.

Bidders must complete Form AOC-CV-414 and bring the form, along with a 5% deposit to the Pender County Finance Department.  All bids must be received (not postmarked) by 5pm on the 10th day of  the Upset Bid period, September 22nd at 5:00pm.

In person or by courier to:
Andy DeVane, Asset Manager
Pender County Finance Department
805 W. Walker Street
Burgaw, NC 28425

By US Postal:
Andy DeVane, Asset Manager
Pender County Finance Department
PO Box 1578
Burgaw, NC 28425

Published notice of this process is pursuant to NC General Statutes § 160A-269.

County Responds Quickly to Sewage Spill

ROCKY POINT – Pender County Public Utilities responded immediately to a sanitary sewer overflow on the discharge line at the Regional Lift Station on Sept. 19. While repair work was being conducted, a pump and haul contractor responded. The lift station was shut down and values were closed to mitigate the leak until repairs were complete.

“The repairs were completed by 9 p.m. that same evening,” said James Proctor, Pender County Utilities Deputy Director. “The wastewater was confined to the road ditch and did not impact drinking water or surface water.

 

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